Matthew 26:14

Thirdmill Study Bible

Notes on Matthew 26:14-33

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Matthew 26:14

Judas Iscariot. Judas/Judah was a very common Jewish name in the first century. Iscariot distinguishes the Judas that betrayed Jesus from other men of that name, and it probably refers to his origins in the village of Kerioth. Judas was one of the original Twelve Disciples (Matt. 10:2-4). He appears in the next parts of Matthew's story as a contrast to the disciple Peter (Matt. 26:25, 47; 27:3).

Matthew 26:17

Passover meal. Central the Jewish Passover holiday was a family meal that included symbolic words and actions that reminded the Jewish people of God's deliverance through the Exodus.

Matthew 26:26,28

This is my body… this is my blood. Jesus used the bread and wine elements from the Passover meal and transformed their meaning to be a reference to the new covenant and new age he was bringing about through his life, death, and resurrection.

Matthew 26:26

Jesus took bread, blessed it, and broke it ... This is the same sequence of words that described Jesus as the two miraculous wilderness feedings (Matt. 14:19; 15:36) which connect all of these events backwards with the Exodus and the Passover and forward to the Lord's Supper that the church continues to celebrate (1 Cor. 11:23-26).

Matthew 26:26

Jesus took bread, blessed it, and broke it ... This is the same sequence of words that described Jesus as the two miraculous wilderness feedings (Matt. 14:19; 15:36) which connect all of these events backwards with the Exodus and the Passover and forward to the Lord's Supper that the church continues to celebrate (1 Cor. 11:23-26).

Matthew 26:28

This is my blood of the covenant that is poured out for the forgiveness of sins. Jesus' death was more than an example of godly suffering. It enacted a new covenant relationship between God and humanity, based in the forgiveness of people's sins through Jesus death and resurrection (cf. Matt. 1:21). See WLC 170, 171, 172, 174.

Matthew 26:29

Until that day when I drink it new with you in my Father's kingdom. Jesus' work of redeeming the world is forward-looking to the time when God's kingdom comes fully to the earth from heaven. This time of consummation is pictured as a time of celebration and joy.

Matthew 26:30

When they had sung a hymn. This refers to the Jewish practice of singing from the book of Psalms. Psalms 113–118 (the Hallel) were often sung together on joyous occasions, including at Passover. This may be what Jesus and his disciples sang at this time.

Matthew 26:32

I will go ahead of you into Galilee. Jesus' ministry started in Galilee and was centered around the Sea of Galilee. After his resurrection he will also restart and expand his ministry through his disciples from Galilee (Matt. 28:16-20).

Matthew 26:31

I will strike the shepherd. Jesus quoted from Zech. 13:7 and referred to himself as God's Shepherd and his disciples as God's flock, the true people of God.

Matthew 26:33

I will never fall away. Peter, who was Jesus' lead disciple and who became the leader of the church after Pentecost (Acts 2) was sincere and whole-hearted in following Jesus. But under persecution even Peter failed Jesus, denying his association with Jesus out of fear of persecution (Matt. 26:69-75).

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