Christ the King Demands to Be
Obeyed

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Question
How important is it for us to put our knowledge of the Bible into practice?
Answer
It is absolutely vital for us to put what we learn from Scripture into practice in our everyday lives. The Lord means to transform the way we live by the renewing of our minds, Romans 12. Jesus said, if you know these things, you'll be blessed if you do them. Jesus said, make a tree good and its fruit will be good. He wants it lived out. For us to not seek to put into practice the things we're learning means we're just gaining head knowledge. Knowledge puffs up, Paul said, but love builds up. And so, our desire is to be transformed in the way we live. But we can't do the opposite thing, which is just look good on the outside and have a shiny, you know, pleasing life on the outside. Then we're hypocrites at that point. We're being actors. We're like those white-washed tombs. So there has to be a complete integration of a transformation of the heart that leads to a whole new way of living. In Romans 6, Paul said, don't you know that when you present yourself to someone, to obey them as a master, you're a slave or a servant to the one whom you obey? And so, we show that we are Christ's servants by obeying him in everyday life. So many verses teach us that Christ the King wants to be, demands to be, obeyed day after day. And Scripture is given to help us do that. It tells us what we're to obey. It gives us commands, many of them, and those commands really do chart the course of a godly life. So, after we've come to faith in Christ, we then are brought back, by the power of the Spirit, to the laws of God so that we can live them out in everyday life, not for our justification, but for our godly living and fruitfulness. So, it's absolutely vital for us to put into practice the things we learn from Scripture.

Answer by Dr. Andrew Davis

Dr. Andrew Davis is Senior Pastor at First Baptist Church of Durham, NC and is Visiting Professor of Historical Theology at Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary.